Shannon Philpott-Sanders

Writing, Reflecting, Teaching, Parenting

What Can Toddlers Do On Their Own?

Screen shot 2013-03-12 at 9.46.28 PMPublished March 2013: Mom.Me

What Can Toddlers Do On Their Own?
Tips to help you figure out when to let go

Article Excerpt:

If your toddler is constantly uttering “me do” and “I want,” it’s likely that she is asserting her need for more power and freedom. “Although this may feel disconcerting and unbalancing for parents, remember [that] it is vitally important that your child learn to be independent, seeking a greater sense of power and control, as well as asking for and getting more freedom,” says Nancy Buck, developmental psychologist with Peaceful Parenting in Denver. Continue reading

March 12, 2013 Posted by | Feature Stories, Magazine Writing, Sample Work | , , | 1 Comment

Rainy Day Projects for Parents and Toddlers

Screen shot 2013-03-07 at 6.18.16 PMPublished March 2013: Mom.Me

Rainy Day Projects for Parents and Toddlers
Home improvement and cleaning are fun family activities — yes, really

Article Excerpt:

It’s raining and pouring, and your toddler’s not snoring. Don’t let a few raindrops put a crimp in your plans. Instead, use this time to teach your toddler something new and spend some quality time together with a rainy-day project. “Children gain confidence when they can do, or participate in, the things that adults do,” says Lisa Kathleen, Canada–based founder of Full Circle Parenting and former Montessori teacher. “Competence builds confidence.” Continue reading

March 7, 2013 Posted by | Feature Stories, Magazine Writing, Sample Work | , , | Leave a comment

The Positives of Toddler Play

Screen shot 2013-02-28 at 7.45.36 PMPublished February 2013: Mom.Me

The Positives of Toddler Play
Building self-confidence never seemed so fun

Article Excerpt:

It’s no secret that toddlers look forward to playdates, outdoor trips to the park and new toys to fill up the floor of their rooms. Beyond making your child grin from ear to ear, though, the positives of toddler play also contribute significantly to your child’s development. “Playing is a child’s job,” says Nancy Buck, developmental psychologist with Peaceful Parenting in Denver, Colo. “On every level—physical, emotional, intellectual or social—a child is learning.” Continue reading

February 28, 2013 Posted by | Feature Stories, Magazine Writing, Sample Work | , , | Leave a comment